Parallel sessions - Utilities

Parallel sessions

 During the Industry & Energy conference you can follow three break-out sessions, one per round. The parallell sessions consist of three rounds, with a short break after the second round.

Below you can find which break-out session you can follow each round and more information about the session.

Power-to-integrate

Round 1: 13.30 – 14.15 pm
Session 1 – 10

Session 1 (same as session 11)

Electrification technologies: Business cases and time-to-market

If there wouldn’t be a time-constraint industries could easily reduce their CO2 emissions with 95%. But is it realistic that new circular processes based on renewable energy will be developed and scaled up to industrial level before 2030/2050? Do we have sufficient renewable feedstock and energy? And where will it come from and what will be the impact on the Dutch and European economy?

In this workshop, VoltaChem’s Robert de Kler will lead a discussion with the audience to find out if it is feasible to have profitable scaled-up processes based on renewable energy that contribute to the huge CO2 reduction objectives for 2030 and 2050.

Round 2: 14.30 – 15.15 pm
Session 11 – 20

Session 11 (same as session 1)

Electrification technologies: Business cases and time-to-market

If there wouldn’t be a time-constraint industries could easily reduce their CO2 emissions with 95%. But is it realistic that new circular processes based on renewable energy will be developed and scaled up to industrial level before 2030/2050? Do we have sufficient renewable feedstock and energy? And where will it come from and what will be the impact on the Dutch and European economy?

In this workshop, VoltaChem’s Robert de Kler will lead a discussion with the audience to find out if it is feasible to have profitable scaled-up processes based on renewable energy that contribute to the huge CO2 reduction objectives for 2030 and 2050.

Round 3: 15.45 – 16.30 pm
Session 21 – 30

Session 21

Transition pathways: Decarbonizing CO2 intensive industrial clusters

Developing transition pathways towards a low carbon industry is challenging due to the complexity of petrochemical value chains, the large number of technology options available and the wide range of uncertainties. What are the technical sweet spots to heavily reduce CO2 emissions in existing industrial clusters? How do the economics work out? And what boundary conditions in energy, feedstock and regulations have to be met to accelerate this process?

In this workshop, VoltaChem’s Rajat Bhardwaj will employ a newly developed tool together with the audience that is specifically designed to support chemical industries to achieve the best technology route for achieving a smooth transition towards a low carbon future.

Power-to-Heat

Session 2

Electric cracking: Technical and economic challenges of a capital intensive and competitive process

What will happen with the naphtha crackers in Europe? Naphtha crackers produce methane which is used as fuel to produce high temperature heat. In this process CO2 is emitted to atmosphere. But is it economically feasible to reduce CO2 emission of naphtha crackers with 50% or more? And what will happen if CO2 emission reduction should be 95% in 2050? Maybe the high-temperature heat that is needed for the cracking processes can be produced through power-to-heat processes.

During this workshop the possibilities and impossibilities of electric cracking processes will be discussed with the audience and a way forward will be defined together. The session will be led by Toon van Zijl, Lead scientist at Sabic, and VoltaChem’s Yvonne van Delft.

Session 12 (same as session 22)

Integrated Power-2-Heat: A quick and flexible win in the industrial energy transition

Power-2-Heat offers not only quick wins for CO2 reduction in industry, but also enables flexible use of renewable energy. Heat pumps and direct electrical heating can be used to complement conventional fossil based heating systems, offering a first step in process electrification and unlocking the option to supply demand response services towards electric grids.

During the workshop Robert de Boer from VoltaChem and Hans van ’t Noordende from Deltalinqs will address the opportunities and challenges of integrating Power-2-Heat technologies in industry.

Session 22 (same as session 12)

Integrated Power-2-Heat: A quick and flexible win in the industrial energy transition

Power-2-Heat offers not only quick wins for CO2 reduction in industry, but also enables flexible use of renewable energy. Heat pumps and direct electrical heating can be used to complement conventional fossil based heating systems, offering a first step in process electrification and unlocking the option to supply demand response services towards electric grids.

During the workshop Robert de Boer from VoltaChem and Hans van ’t Noordende from Deltalinqs will address the opportunities and challenges of integrating Power-2-Heat technologies in industry.

Power-to-Hydrogen

Session 3

Power-2-Hydrogen: State-of-the-art and development potential in hydrogen electrolysis technology

Green hydrogen is gaining more and more traction as a potential substitute of more conventional processes. But how far is the development and what is necessary to reach the potential of the technology?

During this session we will address two topics. Raymond Schmid, Market Development Director at Nel Hydrogen, will discuss the implications of scaling up electrolysis towards a scale which is really interesting for industry. Arend de Groot from Voltachem will present how stress tests help in developing the further potential of electrolysis.

Session 13 (same as session 23)

Power-2-Hydrogen scale-up: Development of electrolysis towards large scale

Recent developments show an increase in upscaling of electrification technologies for producing green hydrogen. Some of these initiatives include the setting up of the Faraday research lab on electrolyzer development in Petten and the 1MW electrolyser test centre in Groningen.

Together with an industrial partner, Yvonne van Delft will lead a session where we will discuss how we need to follow these developments and move towards even larger scale.

Session 23 (same as session 13)

Power-2-Hydrogen scale-up: Development of electrolysis towards large scale

Recent developments show an increase in upscaling of electrification technologies for producing green hydrogen. Some of these initiatives include the setting up of the Faraday research lab on electrolyzer development in Petten and the 1MW electrolyser test centre in Groningen.

Together with an industrial partner, Yvonne van Delft will lead a session where we will discuss how we need to follow these developments and move towards even larger scale.

Session 4

Electrocatalysis: Development of electrocatalysts for solar fuels

For the development of solar fuels, the development and improvement of the electrocatalysts is vital.

During the workshop, the latest developments around the production and testing of innovative, new electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction and photoelectrochemical (PEC) H2 production will be shared and discussed under the supervision of Francesc Sastre Calabuig and Jonathan van den Ham from TNO.

Session 14 (same as session 24)

Power-2-Chemicals: The route to upscaling the electrochemical CO2 reduction

The electrochemical reduction of CO2 is intensely studied in academia with a strong focus on the catalyst formulation and characterization. When dealing with the upscaling of this reaction, new questions and challenges emerge. What are the interesting products? How can we make this reaction economically viable? And when can it be scaled-up?

Klaas Jan Schouten, Senior Scientist and Program Manager at Avantium and VoltaChem’s Anca Anastasopol will together guide you through this workshop where we will brainstorm on these aspects mentioned above in order to map the value chain of the CO2 electrochemical conversion and how can this fit in the chemical industry of the present and future.

Session 14 (same as session 24)

Power-2-Chemicals: The route to upscaling the electrochemical CO2 reduction

The electrochemical reduction of CO2 is intensely studied in academia with a strong focus on the catalyst formulation and characterization. When dealing with the upscaling of this reaction, new questions and challenges emerge. What are the interesting products? How can we make this reaction economically viable? And when can it be scaled-up?

Klaas Jan Schouten, Senior Scientist and Program Manager at Avantium and VoltaChem’s Anca Anastasopol will together guide you through this workshop where we will brainstorm on these aspects mentioned above in order to map the value chain of the CO2 electrochemical conversion and how can this fit in the chemical industry of the present and future.

Power-to-Chemicals

Session 5 (same as session 15)

Power-2-Chemicals: Using electrochemistry for highly efficient production of chemical building blocks from biobased feedstock

Employing electrochemical technology for the conversion of bio-based feedstock towards chemical building blocks with renewable energy is an ideal approach for industrial electrification, especially because business cases are quicker positive for these high-value compounds. Recently, the new EU project PERFORM has started, focusing on highly selective electrochemistry to produce chemical building blocks for plastics, thereby accelerating development towards pilots.

In this workshop, we will discuss elaborate on electrochemical conversion of bio-based building blocks, opportunities and challenges. Voltachem’s Roman Latsuzbaia will lead this session together with industrial partners from the PERFORM project.

Session 15 (same as session 5)

Power-2-Chemicals: Using electrochemistry for highly efficient production of chemical building blocks from biobased feedstock

Employing electrochemical technology for the conversion of bio-based feedstock towards chemical building blocks with renewable energy is an ideal approach for industrial electrification, especially because business cases are quicker positive for these high-value compounds. Recently, the new EU project PERFORM has started, focusing on highly selective electrochemistry to produce chemical building blocks for plastics, thereby accelerating development towards pilots.

In this workshop, we will discuss elaborate on electrochemical conversion of bio-based building blocks, opportunities and challenges. Voltachem’s Roman Latsuzbaia will lead this session together with industrial partners from the PERFORM project.

Session 25

Power-2-Chemicals: Scientific challenges in direct electrosynthesis and electrocatalysis

One of the most advanced upcoming electrification technologies is the use of electrochemistry to directly convert low value molecules into chemical building blocks and fuels. In this new scientific field, electrocatalysis and electrochemical materials play a very important role.

In this workshop, Earl Goetheer of VoltaChem will guide a scientific discussion about novel technical developments in the fields of direct (electrochemical & electrocatalytical) conversion and try to identify the most important parameters that should be researched in the coming years.

Recap sessions previous events

Session 6

Worldwide impact: Scenario’s for industrial defossilization and their impact on industrial clusters

Many solutions are being proposed to drastically reduce fossil-based carbon emissions, amongst which are industrial electrification, biobased alternatives, circular concepts and CCU. But all these solutions are heavily dependent on the future worldwide energy and feedstock landscape. Is North-West Europe well positioned? And will we have enough resources to power our industry? Or do we have to get these from somewhere else and already start making deals now?

A vision on the global and European industry after the transition will be presented by Eric Appelman of Brightlands. In a group discussion this view will be challenged and a response will be formulated together based on industrial development and capital investment strategies.

Session 16

Power-2-Fuels: Opportunities for the production of synthetic fuels from renewable energy

The use of synthetic fuels in the maritime, aviation and heavy duty road transport sectors is an important route to achieve large CO2 reductions whilst utilizing renewable sources. Power-to-Fuels technology, combining renewable electricity with CO2 utilization to produce fuels, is one of the most promising ways to produce these fuels towards 2050.

In this workshop, the results of our previous “Fuel for thought” workshop will be shared together with Natalya Rijk, Project Developer at SmartPort. After that, the results will be further refined under supervision of VoltaChem’s Mathieu Baas and possible next steps will be disussed.

Session 26

Power-2-Ammonia: How to go from vision to action, producing ammonia with renewable energy

There are several options to utilize industrial electrification concepts in the production of ammonia. VoltaChem has explored these options earlier this year together with the participants of the NH3 event 2018, organized by Proton Ventures. Examples include small scale distributed ammonia production for local farming and using power-2-ammonia for large scale energy storage.

During this workshop, the visions of the previous workshop will be summarized together with Bob Weehuizen, Project Development Manager at Proton Ventures. After that a discussion with the audience will be facilitated by VoltaChem’s Soledad van Eijk about the next steps that need to be taken.

Energy Transition

Session 7

The future of hydrogen: Transition towards a green hydrogen economy

The energy transition should lead to a CO2 neutral energy system. But is this possible and realistic? One thing most people agree upon is that hydrogen, from grey to blue to green will play an important role in this process.

During this panel discussion Rene Peters of TNO will lead a discussion about the possibilities and impossibilities of grey, blue and green hydrogen including the impact of hydrogen on existing assets in the Netherlands and Europe.

Session 17

Wind2Heat: the industries’ business case to secure the energy transition

Last year Kees-Jan Rameau (Board member Eneco) pitched the Wind2Heat concept at VoltaChem. The concept has been well received in the industry and in The Hague. With the increasing supply of sustainable electricity being produced by offshore wind farms, more ‘green’ electricity will become available near the big Dutch industrial clusters. Utilizing this electricity in the industry offers interesting opportunities for reducing CO2 emissions.

In this workshop VoltaChem’s Lennart van der Burg together with Eric van Herel, Manager Project development sustainable industries at Eneco, will take the audience along the different aspects of the business case and how it all adds up.

Session 27

Infrastructure and legislation: Large (European) infrastructure and their role in the transition

Besides the technological development, the presence of  infrastructure and supporting legislation is vital for the adoption of novel innovations. Especially when looking at a cross-country or European level. What role does infrastructure play in this setting? Is shared European infrastructure an option? And how can legislation support such developments?

During this workshop, Florian Ausfelder from Dechema will lead the discussion on the possibilities of large (European) infrastructure, i.e. a CO2 network, and how governments should facilitate the transition through legislative levers.

CO2 as a raw material (CCU)

Session 8

Carbon monoxide ArcelorMittal is the raw material for Nafta from Dow

Around seven percent of global CO2 emissions can be attributed to the steel industry. Not entirely surprising because the chemical reactions in the ovens, with which this industry reduces iron oxide molecules to steel with carbon, run at high temperatures. Therefore the steel industry will not become completely carbon-free. However, the carbon molecules that originate from the production of steel can be placed in the ground or used as a raw material for chemicals.

Because of this last ambition, ArcelorMittal  entered four years ago into a partnership with Dow Chemical for a joint test. The carbon monoxide from ArcelorMittal can be converted into synthetic naphta together with excess hydrogen from Dow. However, the emission costs of ArcelorMittal will not decrease as a result of the current emissions regulation of the European Commission’s emission trade scheme (ETS).

Eric de Coninck, project leader and CTO of ArcelorMittal Group would therefore like to see a revision of the ETS agreements so that the industry is also encouraged to invest in emission reduction.

Session 18

The wold’s largest CO2 purification plant

Sustainability is embedded in the fabric of SABIC’s business. As a leading petrochemical company, our manufacturing affiliates operate several processes which produce highly concentrated CO2, such as the manufacturing of ethylene glycol and ammonia, as well as processes that can use CO2 as a feedstock. We are investing significantly in innovative new technologies to reduce CO2 emissions and increase resource efficiency. Our affiliate, United, recently completed a CO2 purification plant in Jubail (Saudi Arabia) that will be connected to other SABIC manufacturing affiliate plants which use CO2 as a feedstock.

Operational since August 2015, it has the capability to purify up to 500,000 metric tons of CO2 from ethylene glycol production annually. That is the same amount of CO2 as is produced by powering approximately 70,000 homes for a whole year. Purified CO2 from the United plant is distributed via a large integrated pipe network, of approximately 25 km, to several SABIC affiliates to use as a feedstock for manufacturing valuable products. The majority of the CO2 is used to make urea or methanol, a chemical building block that is critical in hundreds of materials used on a daily basis. The purified CO2 can be used in other industries, such as for use in beverages.

Speaker: Leon Jacobs (Sustainability Leader, Sabic Europe)

Session 28: Brighter use of CO2

Covestro is using carbon dioxide as a new building block for high-quality plastics, which saves part of the oil-based raw materials used to date. Thanks to an innovative technology co-developed by Covestro, up to 20 percent of CO2 can be chemically bound into a new kind of polyol – a key component to make polyurethanes. Covestro has been producing CO2-based polyols since 2016 at its site in Dormagen, Germany, and markets them under the name cardyon®. The first product of this kind launched on the market is for flexible polyurethane foam, which is used in upholstered furniture and mattresses. Most recently, Covestro came up with a CO2-based binder for sport floorings as second application area.

But this is only the beginning: Covestro wants to use CO2 in as many different types of plastics as possible and to replace as much fossil raw material as possible with CO2. In various research and development projects which are publicly funded the company is working closely with other firms and universities on applications ranging from CO2-based rigid polyurethane foam for the thermal insulation of buildings to textile fibers from thermoplastic polyurethane.

Speaker: Persefoni Hilken (Product Research Polyurethanes, Covestro)

Impact Innovations

Session 9

Project 6/25: 6 Mton CO2 reduction with innovative process efficiency

Project 6/25 embodies the ambition to reduce 6Mton CO2 by 2025 using innovative technologies, financing arrangements and execution approach.

Speaker: Hans van der Spek (program director Energy & Cleantech, FME)

Session 19

Biomass as chemical feedstock

So far, torrefied biomass has been marketed as a premium biofuel for co-firing in coal utilities for the large-scale production of renewable power. Torrgas believes that the highest value creation from torrefied biomass can be obtained from gasification into co-production of high value products: biobased chemicals & fuels and engineered carbon.
The syngas that Torrgas produces is tar and nitrogen free and thus after further conditioning suitable for catalytic conversion into biobased chemicals and fuels. This catalytic conversion can be done via thermo-catalytic conversion as well as bio catalytic conversion since the produced syngas meets both specs. The absence of moisture in the feedstock and thus relatively low reaction enthalpy allows the co-production of high quality char that can be applied in a wide variety of engineered carbon markets.

Torrgas has developed its gasification process on the application of torrefied biomass that has proven itself in a demo phase. The Torrgas project consists of two 12,5 MWth gasifyers, gas purification and conversion to SNG, in Delfzijl (the Netherlands), have been granted. After realization of this project, Torrgas and its investors target further upscaling and conversion of the syngas to biobased chemicals like methanol, DME and acetic acid.

Speaker: Robin Post van der Burg (CEO Torrgas)

Session 29

Smart Electrification of Industry

Cases in the Food, Pharmacy and the Chemical industry

We don’t have an energy problem but an exergy problem. Most industries use steam to power their processes. Steam turns into waste heat to be discharged and new steam is made from natural gas. But why don’t industries use electricity to compensate for exergy losses? Revaluing waste heat by bringing it to a higher temperature level limits the need for natural gas. Not only in the food industry but also in the chemical industry we found examples of waste heat valorisation. For the higher temperature levels, too high for heat pumps and vopor recompression, new techniques are available to decrease the net energy use by applying electrification. We call the substitution of natural gas by a small amount of electricity ‘Smart electrification’.

Speaker: Jan Grift (Managing Consultant, BlueTerra Energy Experts B.V.)

Chemelot by bus

Session 10 (same as session 20 and 30)

Site tour by bus

During this site tour you will get an impression of the Chemelot site of 800 hectares. Along the way you will pass several plants and receive information about these plants, processes, products made and some other interesting aspects.

Session 20 (same as session 10 and 30)

Site tour by bus

During this site tour you will get an impression of the Chemelot site of 800 hectares. Along the way you will pass several plants and receive information about these plants, processes, products made and some other interesting aspects.

Session 30 (same as session 10 and 20)

Site tour by bus

During this site tour you will get an impression of the Chemelot site of 800 hectares. Along the way you will pass several plants and receive information about these plants, processes, products made and some other interesting aspects.